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Sam grew up in Orlando, FL, and has been involved in organizing and advocacy since he was in high school. He graduated from Stanford University in 2012, where he studied how race and racism impact the U.S. political system. Sam has supported movement activists across the country to collect and use data as a tool for fighting police violence through Mapping Police Violence and to launch Campaign Zero, a comprehensive platform to end police violence. Sam Sinyangwe, 26, is a data scientist and policy analyst who works with communities of color to fight systemic racism through cutting-edge policies and strategies. Previously, Sam worked at PolicyLink, where he connected a national network of 61 Promise Neighborhoods communities to research-based strategies to build cradle-to-career systems of support for low-income families.

As part of your account, you’ll receive occasional updates and offers from New York, which you can opt out of anytime. There was a fundamental strategic disagreement between the co-founders over how we should be making decisions as a collective moving forward. The goals of Campaign Zero were tangible from the start, calling for community oversight of law enforcement, the end of broken-windows policing, and limits on the use of excessive force. Soon, Winfrey was praising their work, and high-profile endorsements came in from Barack Obama, Jack Dorsey, and Ariana Grande. MuckRock is a non-profit collaborative news site that gives you the tools to keep our government transparent and accountable. Mckesson and members of the Campaign Zero Board of Directors did not immediately respond to separate requests for comment.

As protests emerged in the wake of 2014 shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, Sinyangwe connected with Ferguson activists DeRay Mckesson and Johnetta Elzie to develop policy solutions to address police violence in America. Together, they built a database of police killings, Mapping Police Violence, and a platform of policy solutions to end police violence called Campaign Zero. Learn how to use data, design, and technology to fight police violence, resist oppressive systems, and build a world in which black lives matter. In this lecture, Sam Sinyangwe will present strategies for using data to support organizing campaigns focused on equity and justice in the United States. Shortly after their meeting, Mckesson launched the Ferguson Protester Newsletter as a digital hub to send information to activists across the country on what was happening in the area. Mckesson, who earned a massive following on social media for his notable presence at protests , found Sinyangwe, a Stanford grad and tech whiz, on Twitter.

A listing or profile on this website does not imply an agency affiliation or endorsement by the talent. Contact a speaker booking agent to check availability on Samuel Sinyangwe and other top speakers and celebrities. With Packnett Cunningham out, Elzie says, Mckesson asked her to come back — this time as Campaign Zero’s head of community. Sinyangwe and Elzie were surprised, however, as Mckesson began “stacking the board with his friends,” though Mckesson says the new board members were endorsed by all of the co-founders. During those intense weeks, Elzie met with Packnett Cunningham, who was the executive director of the St. Louis branch of Teach for America.

He has also helped city leaders, youth activists and community organizations develop citywide agendas to achieve quality education, health, and justice for young black men. Sam grew up in Orlando, FL, and has been involved in community organizing and advocacy since he was in high school. Sam has supported movement activists across the country to collect and use data as a tool for fighting police violence through Mapping Police Violence and to advance comprehensive policies to address this issue through Campaign Zero. Previously, Sam worked at PolicyLink to support communities in building cradle-to-career systems of support for low-income families. Samuel Sinyangwe is a data scientist and policy analyst who works with communities of color to fight systemic racism through cutting-edge policies and strategies. Sam co-founded WeTheProtesters and MappingPoliceViolence, to support protesters’ efforts to end police violence in their communities.

Sinyangwe is a co-host of Mckesson’s podcast Pod Save the People, which discusses the week’s news with a panel of other activists including Mckesson, Packnett and Clint Smith. The podcast particularly focuses on race, grassroots activism, discrimination and other forms of inequality; recommending Pod Save The People in GQ, June Diane Raphael of How Did This Get Made? Wrote, “The stories they uplift and think critically about are the ones I’m now wondering why I’ve never been exposed to/exposed myself to.” Sinyangwe has also been featured on CNN, MSNBC, BBC News, FiveThirtyEight, The Los Angeles Times, and other publications. In the months that followed, Mckesson continued to make frequent media appearances, serving as the go-to person for all things social justice related. Collecting data on police use of force, shootings, civilian complaints outcomes and other outcomes from the nation’s largest police departments. Develop digital tools to help individuals take action to support local, state and federal policy change.

According to Elzie, Packnett Cunningham wanted to introduce her to a man named DeRay Mckesson, also an affiliate of Teach for America. Mckesson had been working in Minneapolis as a schools administrator but came to Ferguson to protest. The plan was for the three of them to connect to find better ways to support efforts on the ground. Brown was only 18 years old when he was fatally shot by Darren Wilson, a white Ferguson police officer.

Sam discusses the evidence-based approaches to measuring police violence in America, and the importance of conveying the data, to the public and to policymakers, in a way that can affect real policy change. Alma materStanford UniversityOccupationPolicy analyst, activistEra21st centuryOrganizationCampaign ZeroSamuel Sinyangwe is an American policy analyst and racial justice activist. Sinyangwe is also a co-founder of We the Protestors, a group of digital tools that include Campaign Zero, a policy platform to end police violence and a co-host of the Pod Save the People podcast, where he discusses the week’s news with a panel of other activists.

He also worked with city leaders, youth activists, and community organizations develop comprehensive agendas to achieve quality education, health, and justice for young black men. Samuel has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, BBC, HuffPo, and other publications, as well as the Root 100 and 2017 Forbes 30 under 30 lists. He grew up in Orlando, Florida, and graduated from Stanford University in 2012, where he studied how race and racism impact does adderall cause weight the U.S. political system. Samuel Sinyangwe is a data scientist and policy analyst who built Mapping Police Violence and the Police Scorecard, and co-founded Campaign Zero, to advance data-driven solutions to end police violence in America. Previously, Sam worked at PolicyLink, where he worked to connect 61 federally-funded communities to research-based strategies to build cradle-to-career systems of support for low-income families.

Together with activists in Ferguson, they created WeTheProtesters, a national resource that provides digital organizing, research, and policy advocacy support to protest groups nationwide. All American Entertainment exclusively represents the interests of talent buyers, and does not claim to be the agency or management for any speaker or artist on this site. We do not handle requests for donation of time or media requests for interviews, and cannot provide celebrity contact information. Sinyangwe is a member of the Movement for Black Lives and a co-founder of Mapping Police Violence, a database of police killings in the United States, and Campaign Zero, a policy platform to end police violence. Sinyangwe claims Mckesson came up with the plan to launch #8CantWait that month — but that the original idea was Sinyangwe’s own. In 2016, he had produced a study that called for significantly reducing police violence against Black people through eight policy changes.